Rental agreements

PYBFS021

The sale of a business requires a rental agreement. The sooner you ensure that you have yours in your PYBFS file, the better. Why do I say this? Many business owners do not have this very important document because they have never received a copy.

Mad rush

Think back to the time you signed your first lease. There was a mad rush as you prepared to get the whole show on the road. Then there was a rush into the rental agent or landlord, some last minute reading, and queries. Then you rushed out the door to get the next step in place. You know you signed the document. Somehow the landlord always signs last. They called you later, or more likely you had to make several calls yourself. They told you the agreement had been countersigned. In the excitement of moving in, you never received a copy of the agreement. This holds true for a great many business owners I see. Whatever the circumstances, make sure you have a copy of the lease agreement, and place it in your file. Make a scanned copy and save it to your PYBFS desktop folder.

Lease reductions = higher value

While we’re on the subject of lease agreements: You should take any opportunity to lower your rental. You would be well advised to do so in the tough economic conditions we’re currently wading through. You can renegotiate at the end of a lease term. If you’re a very persuasive character, you may be able to negotiate a lower rental cost midterm.
Every Rand lower your rental, your profit will rise by the same amount. This much is obvious. The value of your business will rise by some multiple of each Rand saved. That extra value will go to your pension fund for its own growth, and so on.

So, how can you persuade your landlord to drop your rent to last year’s amount? Or can you persuade him to forego the annual increase this year? Keep in mind the effect on valuations, and you may find yourself negotiating with a bit more vigour!

Depending on your industry, you may think about negotiating a new lease in advance of selling the business. For instance, a retail store without a lease is no longer a business worth selling. Retail landlords know the value of the lease to their tenants. The landlord must commit to the new owner with a lease on the same terms and conditions as those currently enjoyed by the owner.

Most factories can be moved, albeit with some difficulty, and the move shouldn’t trouble the customers too much. Of course in boom times, suitable factory space can be difficult to find. But then again; are we in boom times?

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